Apple Considered Buying Medical Startup Crossover Health

According to a new report on Apple’s healthcare push.

Apple’s push into healthcare may have included buying a popular startup that runs on-site medical clinics for companies.

The consumer technology giant spent several months discussing whether to buy Crossover Health, but eventually no deal was reached, according to a CNBC report published Monday that cites unnamed sources.

The report didn’t say why the deal fell through, but said it was intended to help the company possibly expand into primary care. Apple also approached the nationwide primary care group One Medical for some sort of deal, according to CNBC, but it’s unclear what the deal was intended to be.

Crossover Health operates four in-person clinics in Silicon Valley and one clinic in New York City, according to its website. The startup also maintains on-site health centers for companies like Facebook fb and Apple aapl that offer a variety of services like primary and urgent care and physical therapy.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

A Fortune story published in 2015 about Silicon Valley health initiatives described Apple’s Crossover center “as more of an Apple Store than a doctor’s office,” regarding the center’s decor and environment.

Apple CEO Tim Cook recently told Fortune that Apple is “extremely interested” in healthcare sees it as a “business opportunity.”

“If you look at it, medical health activity is the largest or second-largest component of the economy, depending on which country in the world you’re dealing with,” Cook said.

Apple’s medical tool for developers and another Apple health-initiative, Research Kit, was recently used to help gather data for a study on asthma and health. One of the Mount Sinai researchers who worked on the study said that ResearchKit was “particularly suitable for studies of short duration that require rapid enrollment across diverse geographical locations, frequent data collection, and real-time feedback to participants.”

Tech

Irish court gives $1 billion Apple data center green light

DUBLIN (Reuters) – Apple may proceed to build a 850 million euro ($ 1 billion) data center in Ireland, the High Court ruled on Thursday, bringing relief for the government after a two-year planning delay which it feared could hurt its reputation with investors.

Apple in February 2015 announced plans to build the data center in a rural location in the west of Ireland to take advantage of rich green energy sources nearby.

Planning permission was granted by the local council six months later, but a series of appeals blocked Apple from beginning work.

High Court judge Paul McDermott on Thursday dismissed two separate appeals against the planning permission, clearing the way for the project to proceed.

Ireland relies on foreign multinational companies for the creation of one in every 10 jobs across the economy and sees major investments such as data centers as a means of securing their presence in the country.

A similar Apple center announced at the same time in Denmark is due to begin operations later this year and Apple has announced it will build a second data center there.

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar met Apple executives last month and said they had made clear their frustration with the planning and judicial delays and warned the process would color decisions that they might make about future investments.

The government has said it is considering amending its planning laws to include data centers as strategic infrastructure, thus allowing them to get through the planning process much more quickly.

It has said it will be one of the biggest capital investment projects in the west of Ireland, providing 300 construction jobs and 150 on-site permanent jobs.

Writing by Conor Humphries and Padraic Halpin

Tech