Apple Reportedly Fires Engineer After Daughter Posts iPhone X Video

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There’s a reason Apple is so good at keeping secrets. Brooke Amelia Peterson says she and her father have found that out the hard way.

The younger Peterson posted a short video to YouTube from the Apple campus, apparently sometime early last week. One segment, filmed from Apple’s campus, showed off her father’s pre-release iPhone X – the highly-anticipated super-flagship phone due to be released on November 3. Peterson’s father, according to her videos, was an engineer working on radio communications and Apple Pay features for the iPhone X, pronounced “iPhone ten.”

Apple watchdogs including 9to5 Mac and Apple Insider jumped on the video, which 9to5 Mac described as “probably our best look yet at the device in action.” It included substantial glimpses of the device’s calendar app, camera, Face ID, and the new Animoji feature, as well as the physical design of the phone itself.

In a followup video posted on Saturday, though, Peterson claims that Apple reacted to the video by firing her father, who was seen cheerfully participating – despite Apple’s well-known commitment to secrecy around unreleased technology.

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In yesterday’s video, the younger Peterson was conciliatory towards Apple, acknowledging that she and her father had made a mistake.

“At the end of the day, when you work for Apple, it doesn’t matter how good of a person you are. If you break a rule, they just have no tolerance.”

“I’m not mad at Apple,” she continued. “My dad takes absolutely full responsibility for the one rule that he broke. We’re not angry, we’re not bitter.”

Details of Peterson’s story have not been independently verified, but we have reached out to Apple and will update this story with any confirmation or details.

Peterson says she took down the original video at Apple’s request, and some mirrors of the full video appear to be down as well, but copies are still surfacing both around the web and on YouTube.


Apple Considered Buying Medical Startup Crossover Health

According to a new report on Apple’s healthcare push.

Apple’s push into healthcare may have included buying a popular startup that runs on-site medical clinics for companies.

The consumer technology giant spent several months discussing whether to buy Crossover Health, but eventually no deal was reached, according to a CNBC report published Monday that cites unnamed sources.

The report didn’t say why the deal fell through, but said it was intended to help the company possibly expand into primary care. Apple also approached the nationwide primary care group One Medical for some sort of deal, according to CNBC, but it’s unclear what the deal was intended to be.

Crossover Health operates four in-person clinics in Silicon Valley and one clinic in New York City, according to its website. The startup also maintains on-site health centers for companies like Facebook fb and Apple aapl that offer a variety of services like primary and urgent care and physical therapy.

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A Fortune story published in 2015 about Silicon Valley health initiatives described Apple’s Crossover center “as more of an Apple Store than a doctor’s office,” regarding the center’s decor and environment.

Apple CEO Tim Cook recently told Fortune that Apple is “extremely interested” in healthcare sees it as a “business opportunity.”

“If you look at it, medical health activity is the largest or second-largest component of the economy, depending on which country in the world you’re dealing with,” Cook said.

Apple’s medical tool for developers and another Apple health-initiative, Research Kit, was recently used to help gather data for a study on asthma and health. One of the Mount Sinai researchers who worked on the study said that ResearchKit was “particularly suitable for studies of short duration that require rapid enrollment across diverse geographical locations, frequent data collection, and real-time feedback to participants.”