World Economic Forum Says Tech Firms Must Do More to Tackle Extremism

If tech firms don’t act, governments may impose regulations limiting free speech.

U.S. tech firms such as Facebook fb and Twitter twtr should be more aggressive in tackling extremism and political misinformation if they want to avoid government action, a report from the World Economic Forum said on Monday.

The study from the Swiss nonprofit organization adds to a chorus of calls for Silicon Valley to stem the spread of violent material from Islamic State militants and the use of their services by alleged Russian propagandists.

Facebook, Twitter and Alphabet’s Google goog will go under the microscope of U.S. lawmakers on Tuesday and Wednesday when their general counsels will testify before three U.S. congressional committees on alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

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The report from the World Economic Forum‘s human rights council warns that tech companies risk government regulation that would limit freedom of speech unless they “assume a more active self-governance role.”

It recommends that the companies conduct more thorough internal reviews of how their services can be misused and that they put in place more human oversight of content.

The German parliament in June approved a plan to fine social media networks up to 50 million euros if they fail to remove hateful postings promptly, a law that Monday’s study said could potentially lead to the takedown of massive amounts of content.

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Apple Reportedly Fires Engineer After Daughter Posts iPhone X Video

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There’s a reason Apple is so good at keeping secrets. Brooke Amelia Peterson says she and her father have found that out the hard way.

The younger Peterson posted a short video to YouTube from the Apple campus, apparently sometime early last week. One segment, filmed from Apple’s campus, showed off her father’s pre-release iPhone X – the highly-anticipated super-flagship phone due to be released on November 3. Peterson’s father, according to her videos, was an engineer working on radio communications and Apple Pay features for the iPhone X, pronounced “iPhone ten.”

Apple watchdogs including 9to5 Mac and Apple Insider jumped on the video, which 9to5 Mac described as “probably our best look yet at the device in action.” It included substantial glimpses of the device’s calendar app, camera, Face ID, and the new Animoji feature, as well as the physical design of the phone itself.

In a followup video posted on Saturday, though, Peterson claims that Apple reacted to the video by firing her father, who was seen cheerfully participating – despite Apple’s well-known commitment to secrecy around unreleased technology.

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In yesterday’s video, the younger Peterson was conciliatory towards Apple, acknowledging that she and her father had made a mistake.

“At the end of the day, when you work for Apple, it doesn’t matter how good of a person you are. If you break a rule, they just have no tolerance.”

“I’m not mad at Apple,” she continued. “My dad takes absolutely full responsibility for the one rule that he broke. We’re not angry, we’re not bitter.”

Details of Peterson’s story have not been independently verified, but we have reached out to Apple and will update this story with any confirmation or details.

Peterson says she took down the original video at Apple’s request, and some mirrors of the full video appear to be down as well, but copies are still surfacing both around the web and on YouTube.

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